Palli Stefánsson

Páll Stefánsson

Editor and Photographer Iceland Review/Atlantica
ps(at)icelandreview.com

Photographer Páll Stefánsson was born in Öxarfjarðarhreppur, North Iceland, a stone's throw from the Arctic Circle, on June 7, 1958. He studied photography in the Kingdom of Sweden from '79 to '82 and has since been working at Iceland Review magazine, now as the magazine's editor. 

He has published more than 30 books and done more than 300 magazine covers. He has worked for The New York Times, Geo, UNICEF, Leica Cameras, Condé Nast Traveler, Hasselblad, VW, The Observer, UNESCO and SONY, to name just a few. He has exhibited his work in all continents except Antarctica. 

 

Geysir Owners Request Quota on Visitors

The private owners of the Geysir geothermal area, one of the most popular tourist destinations in Iceland, have reiterated their concern that damage is being done to the area as a result of it being overcrowded. They request a quota on visitors.

Tourists Find Geysir and Glacial Lagoon Overcrowded

Anna Dóra Sæþórsdóttir, associate professor in tourism studies at the University of Iceland, carried out a survey for the Icelandic Tourist Board last summer, asking 12,000 visitors about their perception of eight popular destinations in Iceland, two of which the majority of respondents...

Icelanders Love the Theater

Every Icelander visited the theater more than once in 2014, according to the latest numbers from Statistics Iceland. A total of 375,000 visits to theater plays and the opera were registered last year.

Calm Weather Warning Issued

The search and rescue team, Þorbjörn, in the town of Grindavík, near Keflavík International Airport, issued a warning yesterday evening when today’s forecast for calm weather with almost no wind was issued, conditions which have been very rare this winter.

How Many Tourists is Too Many?

On an average day, there are 26,000 tourists in Iceland, or 7.2 percent of the country’s population of 329,101. During the summer months, the number of tourists equals up to one in five people in the country.

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