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Feature of the Week: Game On

Starting with the mega-success of CCP’s Eve Online, the Icelandic gaming industry has been steadily growing. Whether a children’s game, legal gambling software or a device that can read your mind, the vision of the people in this burgeoning industry is bound to shape our future.

Feature of the Week: Sonic Retro

Icelandic start-up company Redwing designs hand-wired guitar amplifiers, which were inspired by the blackface and brownface American circuits from the 1960s. The amplifiers have been tested by a number of musicians, including blues guitarist Vasti Jackson during the Reykjavík Blues Festival in...

Feature of the Week: To Be or Not To Be …

… a member of the European Union. That is the biggest question asked in the Republic right now. We asked parliamentarian Ásmundur Einar Daðason and mathematician Pawel Bartoszek ten questions to capture their arguments for and against Iceland becoming member number 28 of the European Union.

Feature of the Week: Genius in a Bottle

Harvesting human-like protein from genetically modified barley, Icelandic company ORF Genetics is revolutionizing the world of green biotechnology. With Iceland’s First Lady Dorrit Moussaieff and Hollywood stars among its loyal fans, the company’s phenomenal skincare range has, quite literally,...

Feature of the Week: In the Blood

Palestinian born Amal Tamimi is the first foreign-born woman to be elected to the Icelandic Parliament. Mica Allan met with her to learn why politics is in her blood and about the challenges and breakthroughs she has experienced. On November 30, 2011, Iceland became the first western European...

Feature of the Week: Man vs. Whale

Two men; whales are their livelihood. Konrád Eggertsson is a whaler, living in Ísafjördur, a town in the West fjords. Hördur Sigurbjarnarson runs a leading whale watching company, North Sailing, located in Húsavík, Northeast Iceland. Iceland Review asked them ten questions, and here are their...

Feature of the Week: Building a Nation

Since the appointment of Dr Kristín Ingólfsdóttir as Rector in 2005, the University of Iceland has been going from strength to strength despite the nation’s economic crisis. Currently celebrating its 100 years of operation, the University is well on track towards reaching its goals.

Feature of the Week: Law & Order

We, who inhabit Iceland, want to create a fair society, where everyone is equal. Our different origins enrich all of us as a whole and together we have the responsibility for the legacy of the generations, land and history, nature, language and culture. This is the prologue of a bill for a new...

Feature of the Week: Vital Statistics

With ingenuity and ambition, it has become an award-winning, globally successful business, greatly contributing to the Icelandic economy. Júlíana Björnsdóttir visited Vaki , a company that specializes in the development, manufacturing and marketing of high-tech equipment for fish farming.

Feature of the Week: A Seat at the Family Table

Recent months have seen Iceland deliberating over a menu of conditions and considering what complements the national palate, what they’re willing to take as a side order, and what courses don't agree with them. Mica Allan met with Stefán Haukur Jóhannesson , Iceland’s Chief Negotiator in...

Feature of the Week: The Revealer

Defying governments and corporations by publishing their classified data, WikiLeaks has altered the media landscape and helped ignite a global online revolution. Taking the heat off Julian Assange, WikiLeaks’ new spokesman is Kristinn Hrafnsson, an award-winning investigative reporter, who joined...

Feature of the Week: Hairy Silver

All of a sudden, the ocean around Iceland is full of capelin after meager years for this small cold-water fish. 390,000 tons of capelin will be fished this year, providing the economy with much needed billions in exports. IR took to the sea with Iceland’s top vessel in pelagic fishing to witness...

Feature of the Week: Strong Women in Small Towns

The mayors of Tálknafjördur and Vesturbyggd are friends. Their friendship was forged in politics. Both support the Independence Party, the country’s largest party for decades. One has a family of seven, the other has a dog. Bjarni Brynjólfsson met the mayors Eyrún Ingibjörg Sigthórsdóttir and...

Feature of the Week: An Honorary Icelander

Diplomat, academic, author, institute director and security expert, Alyson Bailes is as close to an honorary Icelander as one can be. After a successful term in the British diplomatic service, Bailes accepted the directorship of the prestigious Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (...

Feature of the Week: Fighting Our Fight

Former President of Iceland Vigdís Finnbogadóttir turned 80 on 15 April this year and Mayor Hanna Birna Kristjánsdóttir—in making her an Honorary Citizen of Reykjavík to mark the occasion—observed that Finnbogadóttir’s life was interwoven with that of Reykjavík. In June 1980 Finnbogadóttir made...

Feature of the Week: Pure Power to the People

Today, a staggering third of the world’s population has no access to modern energy services. Since 1979, Iceland’s leading experts in geothermal energy have worked on resolving that by teaching young professionals from developing countries how to best harness their geothermal resources. This is...

Feature of the Week: Invaded by Innovation

Out by Keflavík international airport in Iceland’s southwest corner, a former US military base has been transformed into a burgeoning venture zone with a focus on green energy, health and logistics. Called Ásbrú, the revamped site has plenty of projects that appeal to foreigners.

Feature of the Week: Earth’s Warmth

Though geothermal energy is considered a novelty in many countries, for Icelanders it is part and parcel of everyday life. In Reykjavík, 89 percent of houses are heated using geothermal energy, and the resource as a whole makes up 63 percent of the country’s primary energy consumption.

Feature of the Week: Virtual Realities, Real Success

Founded in 1997, CCP is what is described in the virtual gaming industry as a massively multilayer game company designing state-of-the-art virtual entertainment worlds. Since the release of their flagship product, EVE Online in 2003, CCP has become a world leader in virtual gaming. John Boyce...

Feature of the Week: Through Iceland’s Oldest Mountains

On November 16 the workers of Ósafl finally blasted through the last obstruction of a 5,400 meter long tunnel, deep inside the mountain of Arafjall. The new tunnel replacing the long and hazardous road between Bolungarvík and Hnífsdalur in the West Fjords will be a commuting revolution for the...

Feature of the Week: The Big Switch

From the bubbling hot water at the local swimming pool, to the steam rising over the mountains east of Reykjavík, to the tumbling waterfalls in the countryside, it is visible everywhere: Iceland is brimming with renewable energy. While Iceland is still suffering from its worst financial fall-out,...

Feature of the Week: A Sheep Farmer in Althingi

When young sheep farmer Ásmundur Einar Dadason came in third in preliminary elections for the Left-Green Movement a good month before the national elections in April, he decided to have a go at winning a seat in Iceland’s parliament, Althingi. At 26, he is Althingi’s youngest MP and also the only...

Feature of the Week: Voicing Concern

Tobias Munthe talks to journalist, blogger, talk-show host and media personality Egill Helgason on, among other items, the positive effects of the crisis. “There was such an inflated sense of self-importance but now it seems that society has become somehow nicer again,” Helgason says.

Feature of the Week: Turning Water Into Gold

New Icelandic breweries specializing in quality beer have been popping up in Iceland over the past two years. Icelanders love their beer, maybe because it was denied them for so long. Icelandic beer is largely based on imported ingredients—both the malt and the hops are imported—but experiments...

Feature of the Week: The Critic of Megalomania

Firebrand business professor Vilhjálmur Bjarnason has been fighting for years to get a straight answer from the banks and other public companies. As an advocate for small investors and a former bank manager, he was Iceland’s Cassandra with his gloom-and-doom prognostications about the financial...

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