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Sheep Found Alive after 18 Days under Snow

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Sheep Found Alive after 18 Days under Snow

Sheep are still being found alive in North Iceland after last month’s severe snow storm.

storm_northiceland_landsbjorg_11Photo courtesty of ICE-SAR search and rescue teams.In Skagafjörður, North Iceland, farmers were looking for sheep last weekend. Smári Borgarson from Goðdalir found a lamb on Saturday, which was alive after having been trapped in a snowdrift for 18 days, mbl.is reports.

He knew where to look because of tracks left by a fox in the snow. It had killed a ewe that was stuck in the snow next to the lamb. “The fox left the lamb alone, however. It will survive but has lost a lot of weight.”

The lamb was buried almost two meters down in a snowdrift. The two other sheep in the same location were dead.

“I found both alive and dead sheep [on Saturday] and sheep that managed to get out of the snow on their own accord,” the farmer said. He added that the loss of sheep varied between farms; some farmers suffered a great loss.

Search and rescue squads helped farmers search for sheep over the weekend. However, Smári said he hadn’t needed their assistance because the snow had melted to the extent that they could use horses to traverse mountain pastures.

“What has surprised me the most is that we have found sheep in places where I hadn’t considered looking, for example high up in mountain slopes,” Smári commented.

He added it is evident that the sheep had covered considerable distances to seek shelter from the blizzard before eventually being buried in snow.

Damage to power lines caused by the high winds and snowfall is expected to cost up to ISK 300 million (USD 2.4 million, EUR 1.9 million). A state of emergency in North Iceland was declared on September 11.

Click here to read more about the blizzard. ESA/ZR

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