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Interior Minister Plans Laws to Prevent Terrorism

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Interior Minister Plans Laws to Prevent Terrorism

According to a new bill by Minister of the Interior Ögmundur Jónasson, all mass purchases of fertilizers including ammonium nitrate must be reported to the police, in response to the 2011 terrorist attacks in Oslo.

ogmundur-jonasson_radherraMinister of the Interior Ögmundur Jónasson.

Currently, there is no provision on the production of explosives in the laws on weapons. The bill would obligate those who produce, import or trade with explosives or fertilizers to report all mass purchases—more than 500 kilos in six months—to the police, Fréttablaðið reports.

Ögmundur stated the bill is intended to prevent people from establishing collections of explosives. “We look towards acts of terrorism such as in Norway in July last year and other such acts. These are preventive measures, made according to consultation with police. We are taking similar measures as the other Nordic countries.”

If approved, the bill will enable the chief of police to demand access to locations where explosives are produced or stored without special authorization.

The bill also includes stricter restrictions regarding firearms, such as import of semi-automatic weapons. One person would not be permitted to own more than 20 firearms.

“The bill aims to enforce stricter restrictions to the ownership of firearms than in the current laws. The right of athletes in this field is not being compromised to any great extent and neither is that of hunters. We are trying to find the right balance. We are trying to prevent weapon ownership that comes from other motives,” the minister concluded.

The bill includes that members of organized criminal societies and those closely connected with them cannot obtain licenses for owning firearms.

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