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Scientists: Enough Tension for 6.8 Quake in North Iceland

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Scientists: Enough Tension for 6.8 Quake in North Iceland

The Icelandic Met Office issued a statement yesterday, warning of the risk of a strong earthquake on the Húsavík-Flatey fault. Their research indicates that there is enough tension for an earthquake of the magnitude 6.8 to hit.

husavik_psThe town of Húsavík, North Iceland. Photo by Páll Stefánsson.

Seismologist Ragnar Stefánsson said on Stöð 2 that it is important to pay close attention to the development of the ongoing seismic activity in North Iceland due to risk of strong earthquakes near inhabited areas, visir.is reports.

Since 1900, two earthquakes exceeding a magnitude of 7.0 have hit off North Iceland, in 1910 and 1963, and two stronger than 6.0, in 1934 and 1976.

Volcanologist Haraldur Sigurðsson wrote on his blog that there is likely a magma intrusion occurring underneath the ocean floor. However, due to a so-called density filter, it cannot reach the surface.

The seismic activity in North Iceland started moving more towards the south-southeast yesterday afternoon. At 11:30 pm an earthquake of the magnitude 3.0 hit near Gjögurtá.

According to the Iceland Met Office, this location is new in the earthquake series, which is relocating over to the fault that lies to the southeast through Flatey and Húsavík.

A few minor aftershocks occurred last night, ruv.is reports.

The strongest earthquake in the series—and the strongest in the region since 1976—measuring 5.6, hit in the early hours of Sunday morning, startling inhabitants in Siglufjörður.

Click here to read more about the ongoing seismic activity in North Iceland.

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