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Holuhraun eruption by night, December 8, 2014

Bárðarbunga May Impact Other Volcanoes

Geophysicist Páll Einarsson believes that Bárðarbunga volcano, which is currently feeding the eruption in Holuhraun, may impact other volcanoes in the vicinity, most likely Tungnafellsjökull, where increased seismic activity has been picked up.

The cabin in Drekagil canyon near the eruption site in Holuhraun.

Police Officers Alone at Holuhraun Eruption Site

The University of Iceland Institute of Earth Sciences will not send scientists to the eruption site at Holuhraun until January and the Icelandic Met Office’s scientists have not been able to get to the site recently because of impassable roads. The same applies to media personnel.

Thermal image showing underground lava river.

Underground Lava River Seen in Thermal Image

A new thermal image of the Holuhraun eruption site, shot from the air, reveals a glowing underground lava river. The river originates in the crater, flows under solidified lava to the northeast and extends 14 km (8 miles) to the edge of the new lava field.

Holuhraun eruption by night, December 8, 2014

Holuhraun Eruption Calming Down?

Scientists say there is a slight and ongoing decrease in volcanic and seismic activity at the site of the Holuhraun volcanic eruption in Iceland, which has been going on for over three months.

The lava river in Holuhraun.

Concerns about Acid Spring Melt

Pollution from the eruption in Holuhraun has resulted in acid snow which has been accumulating in the highlands. Scientists are concerned that the acid levels in rivers and lakes may rise sharply when the snow melts in the spring.

Pollution cloud from the Holuhraun eruption, October 13, 2014

High SO2 Pollution Levels in Southeast Iceland

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) pollution from the eruption in Holuhraun in Höfn, Southeast Iceland, has reached 1,340 mµ/m3 this morning. The pollution is expected to move to North and Northeast Iceland this afternoon.

Holuhraun Biggest Lava Flow in Centuries

If the Holuhraun volcanic eruption continues as it has done, then both the sinking of Bárðarbunga and the eruption itself can be expected to continue for at least several more months.

Volcanologist Ármann Höskuldsson at work near the lava at Holuhraun.

Iceland Volcano Update

Over the last day there have been four earthquakes of equal strength measured in the area around the Holuhraun volcanic eruption.

A close-up of a Holuhraun lava fountain and stream.

Bárðarbunga and Holuhraun: Overview of Activity

The Scientific Advisory Board has reviewed data about the development of events in Bárðarbunga volcano and the volcanic eruption in Holuhraun from the beginning of the unrest until present day. The new lava field is the largest in Iceland since the Laki eruption (1783-1784) and probably the...

Photos: Glowing Lava Fall in Holuhraun

A lava fall has formed in Holuhraun in the northeastern highlands. A branch of the lava river flowing from the crater has reached the edge of the new lava field in the north and cascades like a red-hot waterfall over the edge and down to the sand plains below.

The lava river in Holuhraun.

New IR Photo of Holuhraun Lava River

Iceland Review editor and photographer Páll Stefánsson flew over the volcanic eruption in Holuhraun, the northeastern highlands yesterday. It was Páll’s fifth trip to the eruption site. He observed a red hot river of lava flowing through blackened lava fields.

The eruption in Holuhraun up close.

Sixty-Three Big Earthquakes Hit Bárðarbunga

A total of 63 earthquakes above magnitude 5.0 have occurred in and around Bárðarbunga volcano under Vatnajökull glacier between August 16 and November 25. Lately, the frequency of such big earthquakes has declined; last week there were five days between them.

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