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Eruption

SO2 pollution haze in Reykjavík on November 4, 2011.

Volcanic Gases Cause Health Problems

Both scientists working at the Holuhraun eruption site and those guarding the closed-off area have suffered serious health problems because of toxic gases emitted by the eruption. Since the eruption started in late August, doctors have noticed increased respiratory problems.

Baugur crater, Holuhraun eruption.

Mývatn Residents to Name New Lava

According to a new bill on place names currently being handled at Alþingi, the Icelandic parliament, it is the responsibility of the respective municipality to name new natural phenomena within its borders, which means that the regional authority in the Mývatn area is to name the new Holuhraun...

The size of the Holuhraun lava field on January 10, 2015.

New Images of Holuhraun Lava Field

A new map shows progressive additions to the new lava field in Holuhraun since January 1. The lava now covers an area the size of Manhattan. A thermal image shows where the main volcanic activity is currently taking place.

Holuhraun eruption by night, December 8, 2014

Bárðarbunga May Impact Other Volcanoes

Geophysicist Páll Einarsson believes that Bárðarbunga volcano, which is currently feeding the eruption in Holuhraun, may impact other volcanoes in the vicinity, most likely Tungnafellsjökull, where increased seismic activity has been picked up.

The cabin in Drekagil canyon near the eruption site in Holuhraun.

Police Officers Alone at Holuhraun Eruption Site

The University of Iceland Institute of Earth Sciences will not send scientists to the eruption site at Holuhraun until January and the Icelandic Met Office’s scientists have not been able to get to the site recently because of impassable roads. The same applies to media personnel.

Thermal image showing underground lava river.

Underground Lava River Seen in Thermal Image

A new thermal image of the Holuhraun eruption site, shot from the air, reveals a glowing underground lava river. The river originates in the crater, flows under solidified lava to the northeast and extends 14 km (8 miles) to the edge of the new lava field.

Holuhraun eruption by night, December 8, 2014

Holuhraun Eruption Calming Down?

Scientists say there is a slight and ongoing decrease in volcanic and seismic activity at the site of the Holuhraun volcanic eruption in Iceland, which has been going on for over three months.

The lava river in Holuhraun.

Concerns about Acid Spring Melt

Pollution from the eruption in Holuhraun has resulted in acid snow which has been accumulating in the highlands. Scientists are concerned that the acid levels in rivers and lakes may rise sharply when the snow melts in the spring.

Pollution cloud from the Holuhraun eruption, October 13, 2014

High SO2 Pollution Levels in Southeast Iceland

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) pollution from the eruption in Holuhraun in Höfn, Southeast Iceland, has reached 1,340 mµ/m3 this morning. The pollution is expected to move to North and Northeast Iceland this afternoon.

Holuhraun Biggest Lava Flow in Centuries

If the Holuhraun volcanic eruption continues as it has done, then both the sinking of Bárðarbunga and the eruption itself can be expected to continue for at least several more months.

Volcanologist Ármann Höskuldsson at work near the lava at Holuhraun.

Iceland Volcano Update

Over the last day there have been four earthquakes of equal strength measured in the area around the Holuhraun volcanic eruption.

A close-up of a Holuhraun lava fountain and stream.

Bárðarbunga and Holuhraun: Overview of Activity

The Scientific Advisory Board has reviewed data about the development of events in Bárðarbunga volcano and the volcanic eruption in Holuhraun from the beginning of the unrest until present day. The new lava field is the largest in Iceland since the Laki eruption (1783-1784) and probably the...

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