Reykjavík
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Holuhraun

Askja eruption 1961

The Great Volcanoes: Askja

A tremendous eruption started on March 29, 1875 in Askja, in Northeast Iceland, north of Vatnajökull gacier and south of Heiðubreið mountain. The volcanic ash was heavy enough to poison the land and kill livestock, especially in the East Fjords of Iceland.

Grímsvötn

Lava Keeps Building up

The lava from the Holuhraun eruption flows at the same rate as yesterday, mostly around the center of the lava field, which is now around 37 square km (14.3 square miles).

Bárðarbunga volcano in Vatnajökull glacier.

Geophysicist: Sub-Glacial Eruption Less Likely

Professor of geophysics Magnús Tumi Guðmundsson said that as long as the Bárðarbunga caldera is not sinking faster and the eruption in Holuhraun remains stable, the probability of a sub-glacial eruption decreases. However, volcanologist Ármann Höskuldsson remains certain that the current...

sulfur dioxide pollution from the Holuhraun eruption as seen over Reykjavík on September 20, 2014

Eruption Pollution Affects Northeast Iceland

Today, pollution from the eruption in Holuhraun is mostly expected to drift to the northeast of the eruption site, although it may temporarily move towards the east, according to the Icelandic Met Office’s forecast. On Saturday, the pollution reached Reykjavík.

Holuhraun Crack forming

Eruption Stable, Pollution Reaches Reykjavík

The volcanic eruption in Holuhraun continues at a similar rate and the subsidence of the Bárðarbunga caldera continues. On Saturday residents in Reykjavík noticed a smell of sulfur and there was a haze over the mountains in the east.

The glow from the Holuhraun eruption and a cloud tainted blue.

Daily Mail Features Eruption Glow Seen from Jökulsárlón

The dailymail.co.uk featured some images taken 15 meters (49 feet) from the Holuhraun eruption by cameraman Valdimar Leifsson yesterday. Images of the volcano’s glow in the sky seen from Jökulsárlón glacial lagoon, taken by geologist Örn Óskarsson, were also featured.

Northern Lights and Hekla Eruption

The Great Volcanoes: Hekla

The paradox of an eruption is that it can be beautiful and destructive at the same time. The most famous volcano in Iceland, historically speaking, is probably Hekla.

Holuhraun eruption lava

Holuhraun Lava Could Fill All Buildings in Iceland

Volcanologist Ármann Höskuldsson estimates that 200-250 million cubic meters (7.1-8.8 billion cubic feet) of lava have been emitted by the Holuhraun eruption. For comparison, according to the National Registry, the combined space of all buildings in Iceland is 148 million cubic meters.

A forecast of the spread of SO2 from the Holuhraun eruption on September 17, 2014.

Toxic Gas Mapped by Icelandic Met Office

The Icelandic Met Office has started publishing maps on their website with forecasts of the spread of the pollution caused by toxic sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas coming from the Holuhraun eruption, on a daily basis.

Holuhraun eruption

Photos of Lava Flowing into River

Photographer Bernard Meric has been at the eruption site and the areas where the lava is flowing into the river Jökulsá á Fjöllum over the last few days and took the following images.

sulfur dioxide pollution from Holuhraun eruption in Fáskrúðsfjörður, East Iceland, September 10, 2014

Kópasker Residents Told to Stay Indoors

The Department of Civil Protection has advised all people in the village of Kópasker, Northeast Iceland, and surrounding areas to stay indoors, close the windows and turn up the radiators due to high levels of sulfur dioxide pollution from the eruption.

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