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Two plumes from the Holuhraun eruption seen from a distance.

Extreme Pollution Levels in Southeast Iceland

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) pollution from the Holuhraun eruption peaked at 5,400 mµ/m3 in Höfn in Southeast Iceland last night. People in the area received an sms from the 112 National Emergency Number at around 7 am this morning alerting them of the pollution.

Sulfur dioxide pollution visible over Reykjavík

Eruption Pollution Warning Issued in West Fjords

Residents in Ísafjörður and elsewhere in the West Fjords received a text message from the Civil Protection Department at around 11 pm yesterday evening, warning them that high pollution levels because of the Holuhraun eruption were present in the area and advising them to stay inside.

Pollution from the eruption at Þingvellir

High Levels of SO2 Pollution in Reykjavík

High levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2) from the eruption in Holuhraun were detected at the air quality monitoring station in Grafarvogur at 2 pm. Levels were up to 500 mµ/m3, as stated in a press release from Reykjavík City Council.

Pollution from the eruption at Þingvellir

Eruption Pollution in South and Southwest Iceland – Photos

Pollution from the eruption in Holuhraun is expected in South and Southwest Iceland again today. According to the Environment Agency of Iceland’s pollution monitoring stations, the air quality on Grensásvegur in Reykjavík and on Hvaleyrarholti in Hafnarfjörður is poor due to sulfur dioxide (SO2...

A map showing the forecast for SO2 pollution on October 6, 2014.

Eruption Pollution in West Iceland

Sulfur dioxide (SO2) gases emitted by the eruption in Holuhraun north of Vatnajökull glacier in the northeastern highlands are expected to drift to the west today. The pollution could cover the entire capital region at some point.

A graph showing the SO2 pollution levels at Lake Mývatn on October 1, 2014.

Very High SO2 Pollution in Northeast Iceland

Very high sulfur dioxide (SO2) pollution from the eruption in Holuhraun has been detected by Lake Mývatn in Northeast Iceland since late last night, with levels shooting up to as much as 6,000 μg/m3 at the Reykjahlíð school.

Holuhraun new lava river

New Lava Area Continues to Grow

Since Friday, a new lava river has emerged at the Holuhraun eruption site, flowing 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) from the craters. As a result the area covered by lava is 2 sq km larger.

Two plumes and the Holuhraun eruption fissure seen from a distance.

Seismic Activity Unchanged at Bárðarbunga

Ten earthquakes were automatically detected in Bárðarbunga and another ten in the dike beneath northern Dyngjujökull glacier between midnight and 6:48 am this morning. This is a similar rate to what was observed yesterday morning.

sulfur dioxide pollution from Holuhraun eruption in Fáskrúðsfjörður, East Iceland, September 10, 2014

Holuhraun Emitting More SO2 Pollution than All of Europe

The sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted from the Holuhraun eruption has reached up to 60,000 tons per day and averaged close to 20,000 tons since it began. For comparison, all the SO2 pollution in Europe, from industries, energy production, traffic and house heating, etc., amounts to 14,000 tons per...

sulfur dioxide pollution from Holuhraun eruption in Fáskrúðsfjörður, East Iceland, September 10, 2014

Eruption Pollution Drifts to Germany

The sulfur dioxide (SO2) pollution from the Holuhraun eruption has spread to Germany, Spiegel Online reports. With wind blowing from the northwest, the pollution is being felt further to the east than previously.

sulfur dioxide pollution from Holuhraun, September 24, 2014

Eruption Pollution in North and Northeast Iceland Today

The Icelandic Met Office’s forecast for today indicates that the sulfur dioxide (SO2) pollution the Holuhraun eruption will spread to a large area of North and Northeast Iceland, including the towns of Akureyri and Húsavík (click here for a map of the affected area).

Grímsvötn

Lava Keeps Building up

The lava from the Holuhraun eruption flows at the same rate as yesterday, mostly around the center of the lava field, which is now around 37 square km (14.3 square miles).

sulfur dioxide pollution from the Holuhraun eruption as seen over Reykjavík on September 20, 2014

Eruption Pollution Affects Northeast Iceland

Today, pollution from the eruption in Holuhraun is mostly expected to drift to the northeast of the eruption site, although it may temporarily move towards the east, according to the Icelandic Met Office’s forecast. On Saturday, the pollution reached Reykjavík.

Holuhraun Crack forming

Eruption Stable, Pollution Reaches Reykjavík

The volcanic eruption in Holuhraun continues at a similar rate and the subsidence of the Bárðarbunga caldera continues. On Saturday residents in Reykjavík noticed a smell of sulfur and there was a haze over the mountains in the east.

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