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science

Snaefridur Edda

“Girls Can Be Astronauts Too”

When eight-year-old Snæfríður Edda visited H&M in Smáralind shopping centre, she was dismayed to find space-themed t-shirts were only on sale in the boys’ section

From the left: Sigrún Shanko, Margrét Júlíana Sigurðardóttir, Sandra Mjöll Jónsdóttir, Hjördís Sigurðardóttir, Þorbjörg Jensdóttir

Icelandic Scientist Wins Innovation Award

Sandra Mjöll Jónsdóttir, co-founder of the biotech company Platome, was awarded the highest honor at a conference hosted last week by the Global Women Innovators and Inventors Network and the European Union Women Inventors & Innovators Network (GWIIN/EUWIIN).

Face to Face with Sheep Placenta

Five students at Reykjavík University are planning to put on the market a facial cream including an active ingredient made from the placenta of Icelandic sheep.

Fin whale.

“Whales Give More Than They Take”

The importance of whales to ecosystems at sea and on land is a growing area of research. There is an expanding body of evidence to suggest that high numbers of whales support other lifeforms throughout the ecosystem—including those the whales prey upon—and commercial fish stocks.

Cod

Cod Stock in Good Shape

The cod stock in Icelandic waters is larger than at any time since the Marine Research Institute started monitoring stocks of pelagic fish around Iceland in 1985.

University of Iceland

New Supercomputer Hails Research Milestone

The computer services center at the University of Iceland today formally inaugurated its new supercomputer which, it is hoped, will provide a major boost to researchers in many different academic fields.

Surtsey eruption

Surtsey Island Continues to Develop

Geothermal heat levels have increased under the western part of Surtsey island since the last time measures were taken, according to results from the latest scientific expedition to the island last week.

An archaeological excavation site by Hólakirkja church in Hólar, North Iceland.

Archaeologists Believe Monks Did Not Share Churches

Ongoing archaeological research into old monastic cloisters in Iceland is indicating that parish churches were not also used as churches for the cloisters, as had usually been assumed. It appears the monks preferred to build their own churches or chapels.