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Film

A Few Fresh Puffs in between Clichés: Back Soon

Back Soon by writer-director Sólveig Anspach is a heartfelt comedy mostly set in and around Reykjavík about a homely drug dealer and poet called Anna. There is almost nothing original about the story but surreal elements almost never seen in an Icelandic film before keep viewers interested along...

Take the Night off: Naeturvaktin

At a quiet gas station in downtown Reykjavík, surrounded only by the gleams of a few nearby lampposts and the depressing Icelandic winter darkness, three drowsy men prepare to begin their nightshift. Naeturvaktin or the “The Nightshift” is the best Icelandic TV series in years because it approaches...

Cut the Cult: Embla – The Director’s Cut of The White Viking

In 2007, director Hrafn Gunnlaugsson sat down to reedit the somewhat legendary The White Viking (1991) to tell the story of Embla, the bride of the White Viking and the daughter of a high priest of Odin. By doing this, he wanted to tell the story as he first imagined it.

The Forbidden Story: Vedramót (The Quiet Storm) Review

Having written one of Iceland’s most loved comedies, writer-director Gudný Halldórsdóttir does something completely different with Vedramót, which is a shocking drama set in the 1970s, full of hippies, drugs, sex abuse, incest and hurt.

Takk… Sigur Rós – Heima

If one wants to learn about the soul of the Icelandic countryside, Sigur Rós’s concert documentary Heima (2007), directed by Deal DeBlios, is a definite must-see. The documentary was filmed in 16 of Iceland’s most beautiful and mystical places and every moment of it is filled with warmth and Sigur...

Breaking the Barrier: Stóra Planid (The Higher Force)

Stóra Planid , “almost a gangster film” directed by Ólafur Jóhannesson, is a much needed contribution to the growing Icelandic film industry, mainly because of its international concept coinciding with the Icelandic criminal reality. The screenplay was mostly well written and hilarious at times,...

Back to Silly Adventures: Astrópía, English Title: Dorks and Damsels

It is good the see the return of Icelandic silliness to the big screen, something that has been dwelling on dusty VHS since the 80s. Astrópía recognizes the fine dorks of Iceland and challenges the typical Icelandic filmmaking by breathing a new life into the comedy genre.

Sleek Icelandic Thriller: Cold Trail

Cold Trail , featuring a journalist investigating a suspicious death at a remote hydro plant, is the most ambitious Icelandic film in a long time. It delivers a fine balance between down-to-earth characters and beautiful scenery. The script is, however, not especially original, because it touches...

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