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Goodbye Pipar og Salt (KH)

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Katharina Hauptmann's picture

My heart is bleeding and breaking at the same time! Pipar og Salt (‘Pepper and Salt’) is closing down; it’s one of my most favorite shops in the whole world.

Pipar og Salt is a small and super charming shop selling every imaginable kitchen utensil, as well as tableware and assorted food products mostly inspired by the British country style, such as lemon curd, short bread, jam, pickle, chutney, preserve and so on.

The shop, which is located in the very heart of the city center, was established in 1987 and has always been very popular. It was run by the lovely couple Sigríður Þorvarðardóttir and Paul Newton, who were always very friendly and gave their customers great advice.

Whenever I had to buy something kitchen-related I would choose Pipar og Salt over one of the big retailers because the small shop just had everything and was much more personal than a big store.

Whether you needed a nice Japanese tea set, a clay pot, measuring cups, a pasta machine, or something very specific like a bain-marie, differently shaped plastic tips for your pastry bag, a food mill, aclette grill, cutters for tiny biscuits, roller dockers, a chinoise, etc., you would find it at Pipar og Salt.

They would carry any imaginable small tool that has ever been designed for food preparation, serving and eating, you name it. This unbelievable range of products made it a dream for everyone who loves cooking and baking (and eating).

They even had stuff I didn’t know I needed until I saw it on the shelves of Pipar og Salt.

The closure of this business is a big loss for the community; I can tell you so much. It’s understandable though, as Sigríður and Paul want to retire and enjoy their lives without this kind of commitment.

Anyhow, I will miss Pipar og Salt sorely, it was a jewel and one of a kind. And I’m grateful for all those years of shopping there.

Katharina Hauptmann – katha.hauptmann(at)gmail.com

Views expressed here are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Iceland Review.